Grace Creates

I recently learned an interesting fact regarding the history of the Omega Seamaster collection. The Seamaster and Seamaster Planet Oceans that we know today are hardy tool watches suitable for diving, James Bond, and overall feeling like high-function instruments that is made really well. You'd think these pieces started out as serious dive watches. That isn't the case actually. When the first Seamaster watches came out, Omega had other pieces in its collection that were more focused on sport. The Seamaster was meant to be a fashionable watch that one could wear up in the Hamptons while playing with their kids and not worry if it got splashed on. It was meant to be a luxury watch from day one. Overtime the Seamaster became an icon and important watch www.attrinity.com for Omega - especially as the brand continued to focus on a range of important high-intensity activities from racing to diving, and everything else where sturdy and reliable watches were needed (not to mention space travel). Flash-forward to now and we have an incredibly wide range of Seamaster watches, and its higher-end cousin the Seamaster Planet Ocean. For review I am checking out two 2011 Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer watches which well represent where the collection and brand are at today. In short the Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer of today comes in over 20 references, is available in 42mm wide or 45.5mm wide cases, and is available with blue or black dials with various color differences. Inside is an in-house made Omega movement, and it is a comfortable beauty on the wrist. The "Co-Axial Chronometer" part of the watch name replica omega Seamaster separates these Planet Ocean watches from others that do not contain the Omega produced caliber 8500 movements. The other new Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean watches with in-house made movements are the Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer Chronograph watches that contain Omega's caliber 9300 automatic chronograph movements. Those are excellent pieces, with fantastic movements, but I personally like my dive watches three-handed. For a super chrono, Omega has the Speedmaster which now also comes with the 9300 movement. I got to visit Omega and see the caliber 8500 movements being produced. Debuted in 2007, these large diameter movements are made for big watches and are amazing instruments that come from one of the most sophisticated timepiece movement assembly lines ever created. The need for such a production line is due to the fact that Omega must (relatively speaking) mass produce these - but with a very high quality output. They use a very cool automated assembly line that combines mostly human labor with robots that help with precision tasks. It takes about a full day to assemble and test just one 8500 movement. The movements are then sent to COSC for Chronometer testing, which takes another three weeks.

Love God With All Your Strength by Admitting You Are Weak

Posted on: March 19th, 2013 by Jon Walker |

“Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind.” Luke 10:27 (NIV)

No doubt it sounds strange, but in order to love God with all your strength, you have to admit you are weak.

By doing this, you acknowledge God is the true source of your strength and that in your weakness he is strong. You become strong as you become totally dependent upon him, allowing his strength to work through you.

As God shows his strength through you, you’ll find yourself doing things you never thought possible. God promises you can do all things through him as he gives you his strength (Philippians 4:13). You’ll take steps of faith you never thought possible, and you’ll love others in a way you never imagined as God supplies you with supernatural strength and energy.

Tell God you need his strength and really mean it this time. When you try to love and serve others with just your strength, you’ll inevitably fail. And that’s okay, because God wants you to fail in your own strength so you’ll start to rely upon his strength.

Then, love God with all his strength. God knows you won’t be able to love him with all your strength until you become dependent upon his strength to do so. You simply can’t do it through your own energy or strength. God knows you’ll come to realize this yourself and, at that point, you’ll be faced with a very clear, but difficult choice: keep-on keeping-on in your own strength, wondering why this abundant-life thing just doesn’t work, or take the Nestea plunge into a deep-end dependence on God’s strength.

Jon Walker is the author of Breakfast with Bonhoeffer, Costly Grace, and Growing with Purpose. He is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope devotionals. This devotional is copyrighted 2013 by Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

The problem is we won’t forgive ourselves

Posted on: March 7th, 2013 by Jon Walker |

Then he said to him, “Follow me!” John 21:19 (NIV)

We believe God will forgive us; the problem, though, is we won’t forgive ourselves.

Peter knew the feeling; he’d failed Jesus, so he went back to fishing. He’d set a high standard of loyalty and love to his Lord, only to perform a belly flop off the high dive, not once, not twice, but three times.

And so it was that he’d gone back to fishing, feeling lower than a bottom fish in the Sea of Galilee.

How could Jesus forgive him, when he couldn’t even forgive himself?

But then Jesus, resurrected, yelled ahoy from the shore, and Peter, in his excitement, abandoned the boat for the speed of swimming to shore. No shout of, “If it’s you, command me to walk across the water, Lord.” Peter figured he’d have to do it on his own because he’d blown his chance for sainthood.

They ate breakfast and Peter was probably hanging back a bit with a sense of shame that lied to him, telling him he wasn’t worthy to even sit in the presence of Jesus.

Yet, Jesus, showing sweet sensitivity, reached out to Peter, knowing he was hurting and humiliated, but also knowing he’d been humbled into the “I can’t” stance.

Jesus reminded Peter that the sentence doesn’t stop at “I can’t”; it moved onto “God can.”

Standing at the Sea of Galilee, on the shore where Jesus first promised to make Peter a fisher of men, the Lord offered one more lesson: Through God’s mercy and grace—because Jesus died but was now standing alive, resurrected, before Peter—there could be forgiveness of sins and peace with God.

Jesus once again said to Peter, “Follow me!” (John 21:19 NIV).

Jon Walker is the author of Breakfast with Bonhoeffer, Costly Grace, and Growing with Purpose. He is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope devotionals. This devotional is copyrighted 2013 by Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Becoming poor in self-sufficiency and self-righteousness

Posted on: February 18th, 2013 by Jon Walker |

Happy are those who know they are spiritually poor; the Kingdom of heaven belongs to them! Matthew 5:3 (TEV)

When Jesus says, “God blesses those who are poor and realize their need for him, for the Kingdom of Heaven is theirs” (Matthew 5:3 NLT), he means we must come to the end of ourselves. We have to leave behind any self-sufficiency or self-righteousness and come to the place where we realize our only hope is in Jesus Christ, our Lord.

We must be desperate for God: “You’re blessed when you’re at the end of your rope. With less of you there is more of God and his rule” (Matthew 5:3 MSG).

The original disciples had no experience in how to be a Christian. All they could do was follow Jesus for each next step; they couldn’t rely on worn-in traditions that we so easily lean on instead of our relationship with Jesus. They had nowhere else to turn but to Jesus — and that is how we are meant to follow Jesus too.

By becoming poor in self-sufficiency and self-righteousness, we become blessed heirs of the kingdom.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Still trying to decide for yourself what is good and what is evil?

Posted on: January 18th, 2013 by Jon Walker |

Now a man came up to Jesus and asked, “Teacher, what good thing must I do to get eternal life?” Matthew 19:16 (NIV)

When the rich young man came to Jesus, the Lord would not allow him to perpetuate the myth that we can get to the God-life on our own terms. He won’t allow us to live in that myth either.

He won’t allow us to be double-minded in discipleship, where we agree to follow after Jesus but then get sidetracked—chasing hypothetical moral or intellectual dilemmas down trails that get us nowhere nearer righteous living, let alone into the kingdom of heaven.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer suggests that our many “what ifs” about discipleship keep us from the “necessity of obedience.”

We get so wound up trying to understand each step along the way —or, like the rich young man, trying to figure out that one thing we must do—that we become enslaved by doubt. Yet our freedom is found in simple, single-minded obedience to Jesus.

We must do what we know we’re supposed to do, and as we take each step of obedience, Jesus will reveal the next thing for us to do. Otherwise, we end up picking and choosing which commandments to obey, and our lingering debates lull us into thinking we are in a negotiation with Jesus when, in fact, we are simply disobeying him.

Bonhoeffer writes that the rich young man is actually attempting to “preserve his independence and decide for him self what is good and evil.” And that echoes back to the Garden and the hiss of the snake: “Did God really say that?” Surely there must be more to this than what God says?

Ask Jesus to question you in the places where you remain independent of him. Where are you still trying to decide for yourself what is good and what is evil?

Jon Walker’s new book is Breakfast with Bonhoeffer:

  • “Best Christian book this year!!”
  • “Amazing vulnerability, I could not put it down!”
  • “Practical, painful and true.”
  • “This is a real life book about the trials we face in an evil world.”
  • “Unique writing style and perspective on living out the Christian faith ….”
  • “One of my favorite books of the year.”

This devotional © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Christmas Quiz: What’s Biblical, What’s Traditional?

Posted on: December 19th, 2012 by Jon Walker |

And while they were there, the time came for her baby to be born; oand she gave birth to her first child, a son. She wrapped him in a blanket and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the village inn. Luke 2:6-7 (TLB)

The devotional today is different from usual. This Christmas Quiz will help you separate what is biblical about the Nativity and what are simply traditions we’ve come to think are true.

The quiz can be downloaded here. You are welcome to share this with others.

The quiz is compiled by my friend, Steve Pettit, pastor of CenterPoint Christian Fellowship in Gainesville, Florida.

Breakfast with Bonhoeffer:

  • “Best Christian book this year!!”
  • “Amazing vulnerability, I could not put it down!”
  • “Practical, painful and true.”
  • “This is a real life book about the trials we face in an evil world.”
  • “Unique writing style and perspective on living out the christian faith ….”
  • “One of my favorite books of the year.”

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Was it coincidence or was it God?

Posted on: December 10th, 2012 by Jon Walker |

“Look at the birds: they do not plant seeds, gather a harvest and put it in barns; yet your Father in heaven takes care of them! Aren’t you worth much more than birds?” (Matthew 6:26 TEV)

Is there such a thing as coincidence? The way you answer that question will affect the way you give thanks this week. If the blessing you receive is just an accident, you can be glad. But can you be grateful?

If you understand that any blessing comes from God, then you can be grateful to him as well as the people he sends to bless you. Our ability to see God’s hand in the blessings we receive deepens our faith because we not only see him active in our circumstances; we also see him providing for our needs.

Let me give you an example. Several years ago, I realized one morning that I didn’t have enough money to make my next mortgage payment. No doubt, in this economy, you can relate. I’d been laid off twice by companies forced into bankruptcy. I’d gone through my savings, drained my retirement accounts, and, along the way, I was diagnosed with bipolar II disorder.

I’d applied for several jobs and had always been a highly productive worker, but my confidence was collapsing, and, because of the bipolar, I wasn’t sure if I could handle a standard 40-hour-a-week job.

That morning I talked to God about my circumstances. Oh, who am I kidding? I yelled at God about my circumstances (I’m so glad he allows that)! I was tired of the financial pressure. I reminded God I had two graduate degrees and 25 years experience; I deserved better than a minimum wage job.

After I vented my anger, I quieted down and said, “God, I don’t know what to do, but I’m looking to you. I haven’t got a clue. I’ll do whatever you want, God. You’re in charge.”

I sat down on the couch and in a conversation with my Heavenly Father, I said, “You know, I really liked ministering with Rick Warren at Saddleback. And that’s the kind of job I need right now, because they would allow me to work around my (bipolar) energy levels. Do you think you can find something like that for me to do?”

A few days later, the phone rang. It was one of the unsung heroes at Saddleback Church, David Chrzan, who serves as chief of staff.

He said, “Jon, we have a staff member leaving, and I wanted to see if you could help us with an online ministry.”

Was that a coincidence or was it God, the Great Engineer, at work?

Think about this —

  • If you believe the answer to my prayer above was not a coincidence but from God, why would he do any less for you?
  • What are some circumstances in your life that you once called coincidence but you now see as blessings from God?

 

Praise for Breakfast with Bonhoeffer

Best Christian book this year!! – I don’t usually write reviews but this book is so exceptional that I just have to share my thoughts. Jon Walker has managed to share his real life struggles and apply them to the biblical words and understanding of Bonhoeffer. The way he weaves the words of his own story of brokenness with the words of salvation from Jesus Christ teaches us all where our true treasure resides. Mr. Walker shares how he lost his family, financial ruin, and all the while battled mental health demons as he hit bottom. In between anecdotes he gives us Bonhoeffers biblical guidance to inch closer to God, to focus on God, and make God the center of his life. I am buying this book for many of the people I care about for Christmas this year. By jc via Amazon. (Thanks jc!)

This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Kansas City Quarterback Brady Quinn speaking about Jovan Belcher’s murder/suicide

Posted on: December 3rd, 2012 by Jon Walker |

“The one thing people can hopefully try to take away, I guess, is the relationships they have with people. I know when it happened, I was sitting and, in my head, thinking what I could have done differently.

When you ask someone how they are doing, do you really mean it? When you answer someone back how you are doing, are you really telling the truth?

We live in a society of social networks, with Twitter pages and Facebook, and that’s fine, but we have contact with our work associates, our family, our friends, and it seems like half the time we are more preoccupied with our phone and other things going on instead of the actual relationships that we have right in front of us.

Hopefully, people can learn from this and try to actually help if someone is battling something deeper on the inside than what they are revealing on a day-to-day basis.”

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

By focusing on Christ, we catch a glimpse of the real world …

Posted on: December 1st, 2012 by Jon Walker |

When we focus on anything other than Jesus, we’re looking at a mirage of the real world. We’re simply trafficking in shadows that shift and slip away without warning. By focusing on Christ, we catch a glimpse of the real world established in the Kingdom of Heaven. Jon Walker, Costly Grace

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Breakfast with Bonhoeffer: ‘a transparency that is unusual and refreshing’

Posted on: November 25th, 2012 by Guest Contributor |
Jon is probably the best around at taking the writings of Bonhoeffer and making them understandable to all of us. In Breakfast with Bonhoeffer he blends the narrative of some of his life struggles, the deep insights of Bonhoeffer, and the wisdom of the Bible into something each of us can use in our daily lives. His stories are heart-wrenching, and are presented with a transparency that is unusual and refreshing. Jesus does not promise us an easy life, but He does promise to walk with us every step of the way. Jon’s latest work helps clearly show that, and adds to it the insights of one of the greatest theological thinkers in modern times. It will touch your heart, and challenge you to walk closely with God through life’s ups and downs.
Doug Hart
Executive Pastor, Pathway Community Church

Author: Guest Contributor

God requires risky obedience

Posted on: November 2nd, 2012 by Jon Walker | Tags: , ,

“Risk your life and get more than you ever dreamed of.” (Luke 19:26 MSG)

If God tells you to take a step of faith but you hesitate to take it until he shows you what the second step will be, you’re not waiting on God. He’s waiting on you.

God uses risks, large and small, to push us into a deeper faith. And so he wants us to step forward in faith, even if we don’t know where the second step will take us. The not knowing is what requires faith, and the not knowing compels us to rely on God to guide us forward.

Regardless of what we see on the other side of a God-directed risk, the reality is God is there. What seems to be a no-guarantee situation actually comes with the greatest guarantee of all — a God-guarantee — that he’s working in your life.

With this guarantee from God, you can enter into the risky obedience of attempting things that are impossible unless God gives you his strength to do them.

With this guarantee from God, you can enter into the risky obedience of loving other believers so deeply and so richly that you prove to the world that God’s love is flowing through you.

With this guarantee from God, you can enter into the risky obedience of loving your unlovable neighbors just as God loved you, even when you seemed unlovable.

With this guarantee from God, you can enter into the risky obedience of changing your priorities to match God’s priorities, sacrificing, in faith, what you cannot keep for the things that can never be taken away.

With this guarantee from God, you can engage in the risky obedience of making disciples of all peoples, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them that the risky obedience of following Jesus comes with a God-guarantee (Matthew 28:19-20).

  • What task is before you that seems impossible?
  • How would your approach to that task change if you believe it comes from God?

 

Jon Walker’s new book, “Breakfast with Bonhoeffer,” is a message of hope for anyone longing for another chance at life as God created it to be. It is a story of God’s faithfulness, even through job loss, home loss, economic uncertainty, divorce and an incurable disease. Structured like a novel, it reveals how God works through our often messy and inconsistent faith.

This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

About Jon

Jon Walker has worked closely with Rick Warren for many years, first as a writer/editor, later as vice president of communications at Purpose Driven Ministries, and then as a pastor at Saddleback Church.

He's also served as editor-in-chief of LifeWay's HomeLife magazine and founding editor of Rick Warren's Ministry Toolbox.

He is the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer's The Cost of Discipleship. His articles have appeared in publications and websites around the world. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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