Grace Creates

I recently learned an interesting fact regarding the history of the Omega Seamaster collection. The Seamaster and Seamaster Planet Oceans that we know today are hardy tool watches suitable for diving, James Bond, and overall feeling like high-function instruments that is made really well. You'd think these pieces started out as serious dive watches. That isn't the case actually. When the first Seamaster watches came out, Omega had other pieces in its collection that were more focused on sport. The Seamaster was meant to be a fashionable watch that one could wear up in the Hamptons while playing with their kids and not worry if it got splashed on. It was meant to be a luxury watch from day one. Overtime the Seamaster became an icon and important watch www.attrinity.com for Omega - especially as the brand continued to focus on a range of important high-intensity activities from racing to diving, and everything else where sturdy and reliable watches were needed (not to mention space travel). Flash-forward to now and we have an incredibly wide range of Seamaster watches, and its higher-end cousin the Seamaster Planet Ocean. For review I am checking out two 2011 Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer watches which well represent where the collection and brand are at today. In short the Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer of today comes in over 20 references, is available in 42mm wide or 45.5mm wide cases, and is available with blue or black dials with various color differences. Inside is an in-house made Omega movement, and it is a comfortable beauty on the wrist. The "Co-Axial Chronometer" part of the watch name replica omega Seamaster separates these Planet Ocean watches from others that do not contain the Omega produced caliber 8500 movements. The other new Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean watches with in-house made movements are the Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer Chronograph watches that contain Omega's caliber 9300 automatic chronograph movements. Those are excellent pieces, with fantastic movements, but I personally like my dive watches three-handed. For a super chrono, Omega has the Speedmaster which now also comes with the 9300 movement. I got to visit Omega and see the caliber 8500 movements being produced. Debuted in 2007, these large diameter movements are made for big watches and are amazing instruments that come from one of the most sophisticated timepiece movement assembly lines ever created. The need for such a production line is due to the fact that Omega must (relatively speaking) mass produce these - but with a very high quality output. They use a very cool automated assembly line that combines mostly human labor with robots that help with precision tasks. It takes about a full day to assemble and test just one 8500 movement. The movements are then sent to COSC for Chronometer testing, which takes another three weeks.

We’re free to live free and without fear

Posted on: March 13th, 2013 by Jon Walker |

For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline. 2 Timothy 1:7 (NIV)

Making our way down a list of rules appeals to our pride; it nurtures the notion we can earn God’s favor through our own efforts.

The thing about following lists is they keep a bit of fear in the room even as God is chasing this anti-faith out the door with his perfect love.

By tightly embracing God’s grace, we’re free to live free and without fear. The spirit God places within us is one of God-courage and uncommon boldness. It is not a spirit of timidity.

Timidity is based on the false belief that terrible things will happen if we make a mistake. It is a fear that God is not big enough to conquer our failures, whether they be sinfully deliberate or simply accidental.

It is a sin rooted in a passive legalism that proclaims we’ve got to do the right things in the right way at the right time, perfectly every time, or we will be in trouble with God; and that he, like some overbearing father, will keep us from going to the ball because we smudged soot on our Cinder-dress.

That is a lie with the smell of hell all over it because Jesus paid for every one of our mistakes and now there is no fear in love. God’s perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. Those who remain fearful are not made perfect in love; they still fear the punishment (1 John 4:18).

Jon Walker is the author of Breakfast with Bonhoeffer, Costly Grace, and Growing with Purpose. He is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope devotionals. This devotional is copyrighted 2013 by Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Breakfast with Bonhoeffer: God works through our messy, inconsistent faith

Posted on: October 26th, 2012 by Jon Walker |

Breakfast with Bonhoeffer” is different from any other book I’ve written. I structured it like a novel, hoping to show the reader how God works through our often messy and inconsistent faith.

It tells the story of how I struggled with faith after being laid off twice and diagnosed with bipolar II disorder, losing our family home, and, in a heartbreaking turn of events, my wife filed for divorce after twenty-four years of marriage.

I think the experiences I describe reflect the difficulties many people have endured as they tried to make it through the economic crisis of the past few years. The story touches on a lot of headline issues, such as trying to refinance my home and my experiences with the government’s handling of the mortgage crisis and trying to find affordable health insurance. But, ultimately, the story I tell is about how God works through his own economy and how we should look to him, not the government, for help.

It also suggests the Church needs to re-think the way it ministers to people going through divorce.

The book is raw and transparent; it doesn’t try to wrap everything up in a pretty bow. Yet, still, I hope that “Breakfast with Bonhoeffer” pushes the reader toward a deeper faith in Jesus.

The title refers to the fact that Dietrich Bonhoeffer, through his writings, helped me see the cost of following Jesus and that only through embracing the cost — the suffering — can we grow into Christlike character. I think I’ve written something special here, and I’d be grateful if you’d take a look at it.

It is available on Amazon.

Jon Walker

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Seek the peace and prosperity of the city

Posted on: September 24th, 2012 by Jon |

“Seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you … Pray to the Lord for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper” (Jeremiah 29:7 NIV).

Author: Jon

Jon’s new book is Breakfast with Bonhoeffer. Jon is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer’s “The Cost of Discipleship.”

3 Questions Every Teacher Should Ask When Studying

Posted on: September 4th, 2012 by Jon |

By Trevin Wax

There has been a lot of talk in recent years about making the Gospel announcement of Jesus Christ front and center in our preaching and teaching. As our society becomes increasingly post-Christian, it is critical for us to not assume lost people know who God is, what He is like, and what He has done for us. We need to be clear in what we teach, with a laser-like focus on Jesus Christ our Savior.

But how do we make sure that Jesus is center-stage in our church? How do we keep other things from taking His place in our sermons, our Sunday School classes or our small groups? In other words, how do we maintain Christ-centeredness when there are so many other good things vying for our attention and time?

As editor of The Gospel Project, LifeWay’s new curriculum for Sunday School classes and small groups, I’ve wrestled with this question. It’s one thing to have “core values” like “Christ-centered” and “mission-driven” written on the page. It’s another thing entirely to make sure that these values are actually expressed in the lessons. To help our writers, we’ve put together three big questions we want them to ask of every lesson.

The more I’ve thought about these questions, the more I am convinced that pastors ought to ask these questions of every sermon they preach. Teachers ought to ask these questions of every lesson they prepare. The questions are a helpful guide to keeping Christ as the focus of our ministry.

1. How does this topic/passage fit into the big story of Scripture?

It’s not uncommon anymore for me to talk with lost people who have little, if any, knowledge of the Bible. Surprisingly, I even meet church-goers who know individual Bible stories and some of the morals taught in the Bible, but don’t know how they connect to the Gospel. They don’t know the overarching storyline of the Bible that leads from creation, to our fall into sin, to redemption through Jesus Christ, and final restoration. If we are to live as Christians in a fallen world, we must be shaped by the grand narrative of the Scriptures, the worldview we find in the Bible.

Asking the “big story” question will help you as a pastor or teacher to connect the dots for your people. We need to help people learn to read the Bible for themselves, to understand the flow of the narrative, how the different genres fit into that narrative, and how to apply the truths of the Bible with wisdom.

2. What is distinctively Christian about the way I am addressing the topic/passage?

Here’s the question that will lead you back to the Gospel. The distinctively Christian thing about Christianity is Jesus and His grace. It’s the good news about how He died on the cross for our sins and rose from the grave on the third day. So how do we ensure that our preaching and teaching gets to Jesus? I suggest three follow-up questions under this one.

  • Is there anything about my treatment of this Old Testament text that a faithful Jew could not affirm?

If we preach the story of Moses, for example, without ever pointing forward to our Passover Lamb (Jesus Christ), then we are preaching the Old Testament much like a rabbi, not like a Christian herald of the Gospel. On the road to Emmaus, Jesus told His disciples that the Old Testament pointed to Him. The Baptist Faith and Message says “All Scripture is a testimony to Christ.” So when we preach from the Old Testament, it’s imperative that we point people forward to the Messiah.

  • Is there anything about my treatment of this New Testament text that a Mormon could not affirm?

LifeWay’s Ed Stetzer often says that this is one of the questions he asks of every sermon he preaches. The issue isn’t whether or not you talk about Jesus. Mormons talk about Jesus. Jehovah’s Witnesses talk about Jesus. Self-help preachers talk about Jesus. The question here is about how we present Jesus. Is He Savior and Lord? Or is He just a helper? Is He God in the flesh? Or is He just a good teacher? We must make sure we do not present Jesus only as a moral example, but that we present Him as the only Savior, the One who calls for repentance and faith.

  • Is there anything in my application that an unbeliever off the street would be uncomfortable with?

We’re not asking this question from the seeker-sensitive perspective that wants to alleviate any discomfort. We’re asking this question from the perspective of the pastor who wants to make sure that application goes beyond “be nice.”

In other words, if the application at the end of your message is “Husbands, love your wives,” we should ask: Would an unbeliever have a problem with that? Probably not. We could survey people from different religions and they’d probably agree that husbands ought to love their wives. So how do we tighten up this application to focus on Jesus? By doing what Paul did. By saying, “Husbands love your wives as Christ loved the church and gave Himself for her.” When we tell people to forgive, we ought to ground it in the Gospel: forgiving one another, “as Christ loved and forgave you.” When we tell people to be generous, we ought to ground it in the Gospel: “for Christ, though He was rich, became poor for your sakes.” Ground your application in the Gospel.

3. How does this truth equip God’s church to live on mission?

There is no true Gospel-centeredness that does not lead to mission, because the Gospel is the story of a God with a missionary heart, a Father who desires that all come to repentance, a Shepherd who seeks and saves the one lost sheep. The purpose of God’s Word is to reveal God and His plan to us, in order that we might then be empowered to fulfill His Great Commission. God’s plan is that people from every tongue, tribe and nation would bring glory to Him. When we study the Bible, we ought to see it in light of its purpose — to equip us to be God’s missionaries in our communities and around the world.

If there’s one thing we need to be clear about in our preaching and teaching, it’s the Gospel announcement that Jesus Christ, the Son of God, lived a perfect life in our place, died on the cross for the sins of the world, rose again to launch God’s new creation, and is now exalted as Lord of the world. In response to this message, we must call people to repent and believe. And as Christians, we must continue living every day in repentant faith, witnessing to the love of our great God.

Trevin Wax is managing editor of The Gospel Project, a curriculum line developed by LifeWay Christian Resources for all ages.

This article comes from Baptist Press. Copyright (c) 2012 Southern Baptist Convention, Baptist Press. Used by permission.

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Author: Jon

Jon’s new book is Breakfast with Bonhoeffer. Jon is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer’s “The Cost of Discipleship.”

About Jon

Jon Walker has worked closely with Rick Warren for many years, first as a writer/editor, later as vice president of communications at Purpose Driven Ministries, and then as a pastor at Saddleback Church.

He's also served as editor-in-chief of LifeWay's HomeLife magazine and founding editor of Rick Warren's Ministry Toolbox.

He is the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer's The Cost of Discipleship. His articles have appeared in publications and websites around the world. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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