Grace Creates

I recently learned an interesting fact regarding the history of the Omega Seamaster collection. The Seamaster and Seamaster Planet Oceans that we know today are hardy tool watches suitable for diving, James Bond, and overall feeling like high-function instruments that is made really well. You'd think these pieces started out as serious dive watches. That isn't the case actually. When the first Seamaster watches came out, Omega had other pieces in its collection that were more focused on sport. The Seamaster was meant to be a fashionable watch that one could wear up in the Hamptons while playing with their kids and not worry if it got splashed on. It was meant to be a luxury watch from day one. Overtime the Seamaster became an icon and important watch www.attrinity.com for Omega - especially as the brand continued to focus on a range of important high-intensity activities from racing to diving, and everything else where sturdy and reliable watches were needed (not to mention space travel). Flash-forward to now and we have an incredibly wide range of Seamaster watches, and its higher-end cousin the Seamaster Planet Ocean. For review I am checking out two 2011 Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer watches which well represent where the collection and brand are at today. In short the Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer of today comes in over 20 references, is available in 42mm wide or 45.5mm wide cases, and is available with blue or black dials with various color differences. Inside is an in-house made Omega movement, and it is a comfortable beauty on the wrist. The "Co-Axial Chronometer" part of the watch name replica omega Seamaster separates these Planet Ocean watches from others that do not contain the Omega produced caliber 8500 movements. The other new Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean watches with in-house made movements are the Seamaster Planet Ocean Co-Axial Chronometer Chronograph watches that contain Omega's caliber 9300 automatic chronograph movements. Those are excellent pieces, with fantastic movements, but I personally like my dive watches three-handed. For a super chrono, Omega has the Speedmaster which now also comes with the 9300 movement. I got to visit Omega and see the caliber 8500 movements being produced. Debuted in 2007, these large diameter movements are made for big watches and are amazing instruments that come from one of the most sophisticated timepiece movement assembly lines ever created. The need for such a production line is due to the fact that Omega must (relatively speaking) mass produce these - but with a very high quality output. They use a very cool automated assembly line that combines mostly human labor with robots that help with precision tasks. It takes about a full day to assemble and test just one 8500 movement. The movements are then sent to COSC for Chronometer testing, which takes another three weeks.

What prevents you from greater Christian maturity?

Posted on: June 3rd, 2013 by Jon Walker | Tags: , , , ,

“But the father said to his servants, ‘Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet.’” (Luke 15:22 NIV)

In the story of the prodigal, we identify with the younger brother, seeing ourselves as prodigals returning to God.

Some of us even identify with the older brother, realizing we’ve sinfully harbored resentment when God shows grace to others who, in our wrongful judgment, are “less Christian” than ourselves.

But have you ever thought God wants you to identify with the prodigal’s father, who “keeps no record of wrongs” as he scans the horizon, always hoping for the return of his son (1 Corinthians 13:5 NIV)?

Consider that we’re on a journey, through Jesus, to become like the heavenly Father, where we become one with his heart, one with his mind, and one with his other-centered focus. We are called to become Christ-like, and when we resemble Jesus, we resemble the Father (John 10:30).

People will see the family resemblance in us; as sons and daughters, they’ll see the maturity of our Father working in and through us. Our objective is to become a father or mother of the faith, a living representation of the Father’s compassion for others.

To be honest, the idea of becoming a father of the faith is as alien to me as it may be for you to believe you could mature into a mother or father of the faith. In fact, it seems impossible; yet, it’s what we are meant to become.

What prevents you from growing into greater Christian maturity?

To echo Oswald Chambers, “Do you not want to be a saint, or do you not believe God can make you one?”

(The idea that we can mature into fathers and mothers of the faith is presented in Henri J. M. Nouwen’s book, The Return of the Prodigal Son: A Story of Homecoming.)

 

Discover how God can work through the worst of circumstances in Jon Walker’s new book, “Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.” Gut-wrenching honesty, real world faith, not just another ‘feel good’ Christian story, this book shows how God works through the worst of circumstances, including disease, divorce, and financial downfall.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Until We’re Fully Known

Posted on: May 24th, 2013 by Jon Walker | Tags: 

Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known. 1 Corinthians 13:12 (NIV)

In relationships the failure to communicate can be extremely frustrating. But, the failure to commune leads us to despair.

Communication is usually about sharing information; at its most basic level, the transmitting and receiving of meanings.

Communion, however, is about sharing life. It’s about knowing and being known, caring and being cared for on a deep and personal basis.

Perhaps the most pressing need each of us has is to know that we are fully known and, yet, still deeply loved. That, despite our failures and weakness, regardless of our successes and strengths, we are still unconditionally loved.

Some of our families did a fairly good job of this while others failed miserably.

But God, the Father, is perfect in his love, and we are already fully known by him. He created us with a desire for that “fully known” love and so he draws us to himself, where we are face-to-face with him, where one day we will know fully even as we are now fully known (1 Corinthians 13:12).

And our objective-in-Jesus is to carry this fully known love into our relationships, modeling for others a Christ-like communion that that emerges in a place where it is safe to be fully known and still be loved.

 

Discover how God can work through the worst of circumstances in Jon Walker’s new book, “Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.” Gut-wrenching honesty, real world faith, not just another ‘feel good’ Christian story, this book shows how God works through the worst of circumstances, including disease, divorce, and financial downfall.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Jesus Never Looked Down on Others

Posted on: May 16th, 2013 by Jon Walker | Tags: ,

“Think of what you were when you were called. Not many of you were wise by human standards; not many were influential; not many were of noble birth.” (1 Corinthians 1:26 NIV)

Jesus never looked down on others, and that gave him the ability to see them as people. They weren’t users, consumers, or customers. They were people in need of a relationship with him, not a dos-and-don’ts religion.

Once we understand our identity in Christ, we will begin to see people in a similar way. We will see that they are eternal beings, created in the image of God. We will no longer use their circumstances or sins to define who they are; we will see who they are through the eyes of Jesus.

This perspective, so different from our natural tendencies, brought out the best in the people Jesus met. He saw their true value, and, as a result, they came to know their true value.

Consider:

  • Jesus saw a woman who would sin no more when others saw a woman caught in adultery.
  • Jesus saw a man who was able to see when others saw a blind man.
  • Jesus saw a man picking up his mat to walk when others saw a cripple.
  • Jesus saw a huge yet hurting heart when others saw a wee little man named Zacchaeus.
  • Jesus saw an articulate disciple when others saw a tax collector named Matthew.
  • Jesus saw a woman of willing sacrifice when others saw wasted perfume.
  • Jesus saw a stable rock for building the Church when others saw an impulsive, impetuous disciple named Peter.
  • Jesus saw men who did not know what they were doing when others saw evil men pounding nails into a cross.

Our objective is to stop seeing others from our limited perspective and to start seeing them in the way God sees them, encouraging the best of others, bringing them to the one who wants more than all the world what is best for them — Christ the Lord (Luke 2:8-10).

Thoughts –

Think of someone that you have looked down on. When God looks at you and this person, what similarities do you think he sees?

Try to spend one day seeing and hearing through the eyes and ears of Christ. How does it change the way you see others? How does it change the way you treat others?

 

Discover how God can work through the worst of circumstances in Jon Walker’s new book, “Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.” Gut-wrenching honesty, real world faith, not just another ‘feel good’ Christian story, this book shows how God works through the worst of circumstances, including disease, divorce, and financial downfall.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Keep this one resolution in 2013

Posted on: January 1st, 2013 by Jon Walker | Tags: 

For I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. 1 Corinthians 2:2 (NIV)

Salvation is in Christ alone.

  • It’s not Christ plus your good behavior.
  • It’s not Christ plus the years you’ve taught a Bible study.
  • It’s not Christ plus your tithe.
  • It’s not Christ plus the church you attend.
  • It’s not Christ plus the number of verses you memorize.
  • It’s not Christ plus your title in the church.
  • It’s not Christ plus wisdom from the latest Christian seminar.
  • It’s not Christ plus a desert fast (or even a dessert fast!).
  • It’s not Christ plus a good driving record.
  • It’s not Christ plus well-behaved children.
  • It’s not Christ plus your new shined shoes.
  • It’s not Christ plus the right job.
  • It’s not Christ plus the right spouse.
  • It’s not Christ plus the latest technology.
  • It’s simply Christ. Christ plus nothing.

May your resolution for 2013 be to stay focused on Jesus, knowing there is nothing you can add to the work he’s already done for you.

He has completely paid for your salvation. “When Jesus had received the sour wine, He said, ‘It is finished!’ Then bowing His head, He gave up His spirit.” (John 19:30 HCSB)

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

This week stop trying to win arguments

Posted on: November 19th, 2012 by Jon Walker | Tags: , , , , , , ,

“I beg you in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ to stop arguing among yourselves. Let there be real harmony so that there won’t be splits in the church. I plead with you to be of one mind, united in thought and purpose.” (1 Corinthians 1:10 LB)

Stop trying to win arguments.

Instead, make it your goal to love those who disagree with you. Go for the love, not the win. Jesus tells us love will always win; he guaranteed that when he walked out of the tomb.

When you find yourself in an argument with someone during holiday family visits (not saying that will happen), use these biblical guidelines for getting along:

Let mercy guide your response (Proverbs 3:3–6). In a conflict, most of us say we only want what’s fair, but God’s approach isn’t about being fair. It’s about grace and mercy (Romans 5:8).

Let God determine the truth (2 Corinthians 13:8). The truth is not determined by your thoughts or feelings (1 John 4:1) or the opinions of others. Truth is what God says it is; he is the sole authority for interpreting any situation (2 Corinthians 10:5).

The Bible says we shouldn’t rely on our own understanding (Proverbs 3:5), that what appears to be right to us may very well be wrong (Proverbs 14:12).

Look for God’s presence (Matthew 28:20). Satan wants us to believe we’re in the battle alone. Follow the example of the young shepherd boy, David, who believed God was in the fight and that the battle belonged to the Lord (1 Samuel 17:47).

Look for the conflict’s true source (Ephesians 6:12). According to God’s Word, we’re really not fighting other people; our real enemy is Satan and his “unseen spiritual forces of wickedness.”

Lay down human weapons (2 Corinthians 10:4–5). When we try to meet our own needs, working independently of God, we tend to use what the Apostle Paul called weapons of the flesh. These include: manipulation, gossip, slander, ridicule, threats, blame, nagging, deception, and silence. When we use them, we end up in an “evil for evil” cycle, and that’s like trying to fight a skunk with “stink” — everybody loses!

Learn to use spiritual weapons (2 Corinthians 10:4). The Bible tells us that prayer is a powerful spiritual weapon. After we put on the whole armor of God, we’re to “pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests” (Ephesians 6:18 NIV).

 

Jon Walker’s new book, Breakfast with Bonhoeffer: “Gut-wrenching honesty, real world faith, not just another ‘feel good’ Christian story”.

This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Be you

Posted on: October 18th, 2012 by Jon Walker | Tags: 

“By the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace to me was not without effect. No, I worked harder than all of them—yet not I, but the grace of God that was with me.” (1 Corinthians 15:10 NIV)

God wants you to be you.

You don’t have to try to pretend to be someone else; you don’t have to hide who you actually are. The most attractive people I know are not the best looking; rather, they’re true to who they are.

There’s no pretense about them.

You can relax knowing that being yourself is exactly what God wants of you. You bring glory to God just by being yourself, because he created you to be just the person you are.

Now, believe you are who God says you are!

No one else has a vote on who you are. You’re free to be you instead of imitating someone else. You’re free to use your unique, God-given gifts, and there’s no need to compare your gifts to the gifts of others.

No one else is in competition to be you!

You are God’s masterpiece, a work of his own hands.

“By the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace to me was not without effect. No, I worked harder than all of them—yet not I, but the grace of God that was with me” (1 Corinthians 15:10 NIV).

What now?

Where are the places in your life where you’re still trying to be someone else? Ask God to help you be yourself.

 

My new book is Breakfast with Bonhoeffer. It is different from the other books I’ve written, presented like a novel telling the story of God’s faithfulness even in the midst of a messy faith.

This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

One Spirit to Guide Us

Posted on: October 3rd, 2012 by Jon Walker | Tags: , , , , ,

But he who unites himself with the Lord is one with him in spirit. 1 Corinthians 6:17 (NIV)

With one Spirit guiding us, we can learn to think like Jesus. We no longer need to understand it all because we know that our perfect God is in control and that our imperfect perceptions are not based in the full reality of his omniscient plan (1 Corinthians 2:15–16; Proverbs 3:5; Proverbs 14:12).

Since we’re one with the Lord in spirit, we can rely on the holy logic of Christ and we can place the interests of others above our own (1 Corinthians 6:17).

We look to God to tell us what is true, knowing that our feelings, and even our thoughts, do not determine the truth. We look to God, knowing that the opinions of others—even a majority—do not have the final say on what is true. Truth is what God says it is and God alone holds the authority to interpreting any situation or circumstance (2 Corinthians 13:8; 1 John 4:1; 2 Corinthians 10:5).

Our courage and confidence to overcome the Devil, sin, and the fallen world is in Christ and his truth, and so Satan, the mortal enemy of Christ, seeks to discourage us by deceitfully blinding us to the reality of Christ in us, the hope of glory (Colossians 1:27).

Christ crucified is now Christ risen, and Christ risen sends the Spirit to you, uniting you with him and uniting you with other Jesus-ones, like a vine unites its branches together (John 16:7; 1 Corinthians 6:17; John 15 1:8).

 

Jon’s new book, Breakfast with Bonhoeffer, is a story of God’s faithfulness during struggles with bipolar disorder, divorce, and economic uncertainty.

This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Jon Walker

Jon Walker is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and a contributing editor at pastors.com. © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. Used by permission.

Let Us Keep in Step with the Spirit

Posted on: September 11th, 2012 by Chris | Tags: , , ,

By Jon Walker

“Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit.” (Galatians 5:25 NIV)

When we ignore the Holy Spirit, there’s little difference between the way we live our lives and non-believers who live their lives disconnected and independent from God.

“But people who aren’t spiritual can’t receive these truths from God’s Spirit. It all sounds foolish to them and they can’t understand it, for only those who are spiritual can understand what the Spirit means” (1 Corinthians 2:14 NLT).

Our objective is to become sensitive to the Holy Spirit. Ask God to teach you to hear his still small voice and to be sensitive to promptings from the Spirit that he’s placed inside you. Then, believe the truth that he will guide you through the decisions and details of your life.

As you learn to walk in the Spirit, God will never ask you to do anything that violates his Word. Promptings from the Holy Spirit will always line up with the Bible; however, they may not line up with your church-ianity traditions or pre-conceived notions.

For the next few weeks, keep a list of all the times you sense the Spirit prompting you. This will help you learn to be sensitive to the Spirit, but it will also strengthen your resolve to be obedient to God’s guidance as you see his constant, loving interest in the details of your life.

And what if you blow it? Remember God’s grace! If you misunderstand the Holy Spirit’s prompting or disobey it, then confess your failure to God; he is faithful to forgive (1 John 1:9). Fall on his grace and remember that you are in the school of Christ. He knows you’re learning; he sent the Holy Spirit to teach you.

Jon’s new book is Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.

Jon is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer’s “The Cost of Discipleship.”  This devotional © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Chris

Jon Walker’s new book, Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.: “Gut-wrenching honesty, real world faith, not just another 'feel good' Christian story". This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

You Can Trust God

Posted on: August 31st, 2012 by Chris | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

By Jon Walker

“For the word of the Lord is right and true; he is faithful in all he does. The Lord loves righteousness and justice; the earth is full of his unfailing love.” (Psalm 33:4-5 NIV)

If we doubt God, the issue is not over God’s ability to support us. He clearly can do that.

God is the sovereign, supreme ruler of the universe, powerful enough to overcome any problem or defeat any enemy: “Everything comes from him; Everything happens through him; Everything ends up in him” (Romans 11:36 MSG).

God is love (1 John 4:16), so we know he is patient and kind. He’s never rude or self-seeking; he’s not easily angered, and he keeps no record of wrongs. He does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. He always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. He never fails (1 Corinthians 13:4-8).

God is always fair (Deuteronomy 32:4); he’s pure and honest (Hebrews 6:18). He cannot break a promise (Numbers 23:19), never fails to fulfill a promise (Joshua 21:45) and is trustworthy in everything he does (Psalm 33:4).

The issue, then, is not if God can be trusted; the issue is with your ability to trust.

Talk About It

What adjectives would you use to describe your attitude when you focus your attention on God? What about when you focus your attention on yourself?

God gives peace to all who trust in him (Isaiah 26:3). Pray for each other, that you would learn to trust more and receive God’s peace.

Jon’s new book is Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.

Jon is managing editor of Rick Warren’s Daily Hope Devotionals and the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer’s “The Cost of Discipleship.”  This devotional © Copyright 2013 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Author: Chris

Jon Walker’s new book, Breakfast with Bonhoeffer.: “Gut-wrenching honesty, real world faith, not just another 'feel good' Christian story". This devotional © Copyright 2012 Jon Walker. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

About Jon

Jon Walker has worked closely with Rick Warren for many years, first as a writer/editor, later as vice president of communications at Purpose Driven Ministries, and then as a pastor at Saddleback Church.

He's also served as editor-in-chief of LifeWay's HomeLife magazine and founding editor of Rick Warren's Ministry Toolbox.

He is the author of Costly Grace: A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer's The Cost of Discipleship. His articles have appeared in publications and websites around the world. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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